Posts Tagged ‘Reverberation’

The Iconic History of Lewis Leathers: From Winston Churchill to Kate Moss, British Motorcycle Police to Comme des Garcons, by way of Steve McQueen, John Lennon, The Clash, Carl Barât, Cate Blanchett…

by Guy Sangster Adamslewis-logo-bkwt-copy

k-moss-ll-cyclone-copy

With the current fashion feature prevalence of leather biker jackets one brand continues to blow the others into the dust, Lewis Leathers. The October 2008 Vogue feature which presaged the current ubiquity, showed Kate Moss in two vintage, customised Lewis Leathers jackets, a Cyclone and a sleeveless 391 Lightning; she also owns a pair of Lewis Leathers 191 Motorway boots The buzz that these pictures generated is still being felt at the new Lewis Leathers showroom and archive in West London, where staff are still receiving enquiries from women and men alike as to whether these styles are still available; they are, for both sexes. Enquiries redoubled with the images of Cate Blanchett in the January 2009 issue of Interview wearing a mixture of vintage and new Lewis Leathers; a fringed 391 Lightning jacket, a pair of 935 leather jeans, and an early 90s Triumph tank logo belt from their collection of motorcycle ephemera.

THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ISSUE 2 OF THE PRINT EDITION OF PLECTRUM-THE CULTURAL PICK
plectrum-issue-2-cover

For more details about how to buy a copy of P-TCP issue 2 click here





Plectrum – The Cultural Pick

Promote Your Page Too

Reverberation: The Iconic History of Artist and Designer Nigel Waymouth, by way of Granny Takes A Trip, Hapshash & the Coloured Coat, and The Look Presents…

When in December 1965, Nigel Waymouth, Sheila Cohen, and John Pearce first opened the doors of Granny Takes A Trip they were perceptively at the vanguard of a moment of counter-cultural and pop-cultural combustion.  Hailed as London’s first psychedelic boutique—though Waymouth now charmingly says, “what does psychedelic mean, I’ve never known, actually!”—Granny Takes A Trip ground Cuban-heeled Gohill boots into the established ideas of what, how, and where a clothes shop might be, triggering reverberations that changed the face of 1960s boutiques and are still evident today.

THE FULL VERSION OF THIS ARTICLE IS AVAILABLE IN ISSUE 1 OF THE PRINT EDITION OF PLECTRUM-THE CULTURAL PICK

plectrum-1

For more details about how to buy a copy of P-TCP issue 1 click here






Plectrum – The Cultural Pick

Promote Your Page Too